villa-rosie:

Castle Howard
nature-and-culture:

Charles Baudelaire,  (1821 – 1867) was a French poet who also produced notable work as an essayist, art critic, and pioneering translator of Edgar Allan Poe. His most famous work, Les Fleurs du mal (The Flowers of Evil), expresses the changing nature of beauty in modern, industrializing Paris during the 19th century. 
echiromani:

Santa Maria in Trastevere, perhaps the first church in the world where Mass was publicly celebrated.
gillianstevens:

The Saturday morning market was almost too much for my little heart to handle! Rows of French antique collectibles, artwork and linens, dried lavender, jams and honey, produce and freshly picked flowers. So dreamy. (at Cour d’Appel de Aix en Provence)

Romy Schneider on the set of The Trial, 1962.
It is September, and I have already spent over half the year thinking of you.
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Wild and perverted. This cruel animal is always ready to snap up the innocent who come too close to her she-wolf jaws.

Les Démoniaques (1974)

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I don’t want a lukewarm love. I want it to burn my lips and engulf my soul.

— Woori  (via fleurpoesie)

(Source: pinkholic)

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garcon-portraits:

cnyck:

L’uomo Vogue

love this
coolhomo:

A Single Man, 2009
Adieu, adieu, adieu, toi seul que j’ai aimé d’un amour noble et fort. Plains-moi, je vais vivre.

Leïla, George Sand. (via leclubdeshachichins)

(Source: envertudelamour)

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thenightmareofjawz:

Lacrimosa or tear bottles reappeared during the Victorian time period of the 19th century. During this time these bottles were used with special stoppers. The mourners would collect their tears and mourn until the tears evaporated, thus showing the end of the mourning period. 
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I want to taste and glory in each day, and never be afraid to experience pain; and never shut myself up in a numb core of nonfeeling, or stop questioning and criticizing life and take the easy way out. To learn and think: to think and live; to live and learn: this always, with new insight, new understanding, and new love.

Sylvia Plath, The Unabridged Journals of Sylvia Plath (via sisyphean-revolt)

(Source: greyeyedlauren)

20th September, SaturdayReblog